Only the proud are blinded by their pride.

That’s an interesting thought.  Pride blinds us to our own faults, yet magnifies the faults of others.  Pride makes me look and feel better about myself, yet to others the very thing that I find affirming is repulsive.  Pride makes me love myself more, yet pushes those I love further away.  Only the proud miss this.


Pride is a sedative that relieves us of our insecurities yet numbs us to our faults. Pride can make you feel better about yourself but cannot improve your self image.  Pride blinds us to the needs of others while making us super-sensitive to our own needs.   The Apostle Paul countered this sinful vice with the admonition, “Let nothing be done through contention, neither by vain glory: but in humility, let each esteem others better than themselves” (Phil. 2:3).  In order to see the needs of others we have to look past our own pride.  Only the proud miss this.

This next week the Southern Baptist Convention will hold its annual meeting in Louisville, KY.  I guess I need a reminder that in the midst of a wonderful event of fellowship and partnership that such settings are perfect platforms for pride to set in.  It’s easy to want to be noticed, to want to be seen with the VIPs, to want to be considered as “better than” others.  The Apostle Paul would likely love the fellowship and gospel partnership.  He would certainly hate the opportunity for pride.  He would call it for what it is.  Only the proud miss this.

This is just a reminder to myself that the greatest and highest calling I have is to be the servant of Christ.  May God protect this pride-prone heart from being blinded from the important things. As C.S. Lewis once said,  “A proud man is always looking down on things and people; and, of course, as long as you’re looking down, you can’t see something that’s above you.”  I want to look out to see others and look up to see God.  I want to learn to be humble.  Only the proud miss this.