The whole thing was going downhill fast.

Things were beginning to unravel.

The darkness of the moment was palpable.

Jesus’ immanent death had been illustrated by the observance of the traditional Passover meal.  Peter’s forthcoming denial was prophesied.  The abundant life that Jesus had spoken so much of seemed to be very distant from this precarious scene.

In the fourteenth chapter of the gospel of John we see the Messiah speaking words of comfort to his disheartened disciples.

On the eve of his death he encouraged them with these words:

“Do not let your heart be troubled; believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many dwelling places; if it were not so, I would have told you; for I go to prepare a place for you. If I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you to myself, that where I am, there you may be also. And you know the way where I am going.”

They would be able to endure the pain of seeing him brutally murdered because they knew there was more to the story.  The grave would not be the end.  His resurrection would provide the courage they needed to take the gospel beyond the city limits of Jerusalem at the risk of their very lives.  Death was about to be undone.

I’m thankful for a disciple who is known for doubt.  His name is Thomas.  He asked a simple question in response to Jesus’ promise, “Lord, we do not know where you are going, how do we know the way?”

Jesus’ response is epic, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father but through me.”

Perhaps the most abiding joy and confidence we can experience today will come as a result of grasping and being grasped by the truth of Jesus’ words.  He alone is the way, the truth and the life. Our frail lives are but a vapor and death will come for us all.  But in Christ death will be undone. One day we will be with him.  This is joy and this is peace, to know the Undoer of death and the Savior of our souls.

Scripture taken from John 14:1-6, NASB